ESXi Network Troubleshooting Tools

In the previous post about the ESXi network IOchain we explored the various constructs that belong to the network path. This blog post builds on top of that and focuses on the tools for advanced network troubleshooting and verification. Today, vSphere ESXi is packaged with a extensive toolset that helps you to check connectivity or verify bandwidth availability. Some tools are not only applicable for inside your ESXi box, but also very usable for the physical network components involved in the network paths.

Access to the ESXi shell is a necessity as the commands are executed here. A good starting point for connectivity troubleshooting is the esxtop network view. Also, the esxcli network commandlet provides a lot of information. We also have (vmk)ping, traceroute at our disposal. However, if you are required to dig deeper into an network issue, the following list of tools might help you out:

  • net-stats
  • pktcap-uw
  • nc
  • iperf

Net-stats

We’ll start of with one of my favorites; net-stats. This command can get you a lot of deep dive insights on what is happening under the covers of networking on a ESXi host as it can collect port stats and . The command is quite extensive as it allows for a lot of options. The net-stats -h command displays all flags. The most common one being the list option. Use net-stats -l to determine the switchport numbers and MAC addresses for all VMkernel interfaces, vmnic uplinks and vNIC ports. This information is also used for input for other tools described in the blog post.

To give some more examples, net-stats can also provide in-depth details on what worldlets (or CPU threads, listed as “sys”) are spun up for handling network IO by issuing net-stats with the following flags: net-stats -A -t vW. Output provided by these options help in verifying if NetQueue or Receive Side Scaling (RSS) is active for vmnic’s by mapping the “sys” output to the worldlet name using i.e. the vsi shell (vsish -e cat /world/<world id>/name).

Using different options, net-stats provides great insights on network behaviour.

Pktcap-uw

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Understanding the ESXi Network IOChain

In this blog post, we go into the trenches of the (Distributed) vSwitch with a focus on vSphere ESXi network IOChain. It is important to understand the core constructs of the vSphere networking layers for i.e. troubleshooting connectivity issues. In a second blog post on this topic, we will look closer into virtual network troubleshoot tooling.

IOChain

The vSphere ESXi network IOChain is a framework that provides the capability to insert functions into the network data-path regardless of the usage of a vSphere Standard Switch (VSS) or a vSphere Distributed Switch (VDS). The IOChain is a group of functions that provides connectivity between ports and the vSwitch. A port has two IOChains based on the direction to and from the vSwitch. Meaning each port in a set is associated with it an input and an output IOChain. This allows for a modular approach by only including optional elements in an IOChain as configured by the user.

Examples of optional elements in an IOChain are VLAN support, NIC teaming, and traffic shaping. Looking at the high-level components in an ESXi network IOChain, we differentiate between the port group, the vSwitch (VSS or VDS) and the uplink level.

Port group level

This is where an optional configured VLAN is interpreted by the VLAN filter, allowing for VLAN dot1q tags for your port group. The security settings Promiscuous mode, MAC address changes, and Forged transmits are also set at the port group level. The user can also optionally configure traffic shaping, either egress only when using a VSS or bi-directional traffic shaping when using a VDS.

vSwitch (VSS or VDS) level

Incoming packets at the vSwitch level are forwarded to their destination using the forwarding engine. Incoming packets at the vSwitch level are forwarded to their destination using the forwarding engine. The forwarding engine contains port information paired with MAC address information. It’s job is to send the traffic to its proper destination. That can be either a VM residing on the same ESXi host or an external host.

The teaming engine is responsible for balancing network packets over the uplink interfaces. The way it does so is depended on the chosen teaming configuration by the user. The traffic shaper module is added to the IOChain if enabled in the port group level.

Uplink level

At this level, the traffic sent from the vSwitch to an external host finds its way to the driver module. This is where all the hardware offloading is taking place. The Supported hardware offloading features depends strongly on the physical NIC in combination with a specific driver module. Typically supported hardware offloading functions that in NICs are TCP Segment Offload (TSO), Large Receive Offload (LRO) or Checksum Offload (CSO). Network overlay protocol offloading like with VXLAN and Geneve, as used in NSX-v and NSX-T respectively, are widely supported on modern NICs.

Next to hardware offloading, the buffer mechanisms come into play in the Uplink level. I.e., when processing a burst of network packets, ring buffers come into play. Finally, the bits transmit onto the DMA controller to be handled by the CPU and physical NIC onwards to the Ethernet fabric.

Standard vSwitch

The following diagram puts all components together to form the IO chain for vSphere networking using a standard vSwitch: (more…)

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